www.gryphel.com/c/minivmac/build - feedback
copyright (c) 2014 Paul C. Pratt - last update 3/15/2014

Building

Mini vMac


Macintosh OS X - Intel

Xcode

Macintosh OS X - PowerPC

Xcode
Metrowerks CodeWarrior

Microsoft Windows

Microsoft Visual C++
lcc-win32 system
Bloodshed Dev-C++
Metrowerks CodeWarrior

Macintosh OS 9

MPW
Metrowerks CodeWarrior

Linux

Linux command line

Solaris

Gnu C compiler


How to build the Mini vMac program from the source code.

First download the source code archive from the download page, a file with the name “minivmac-3.x.x.src.zip”. Extract from this zip file a disk image (named “minivmac-3.x.x.src.dsk”).

Now launch Mini vMac (version 3.0.0 or later), booting from a disk image containing a system folder. (The source code disk image doesn't contain a system folder.) (See the Start page for information about getting started with Mini vMac.)

Mount the source code disk image in Mini vMac. At the top level of this disk is an application named "MnvM_b34". Launch this application. A text editing window will open in which to type in the desired options.

note: The "MnvM_b34" application can also be run on a real 680x0 Macintosh, or in a different Macintosh 680x0 emulator besides Mini vMac. (To access the build system files, you need to mount its disk image. See the Disk Image page.)

Only the “Target” option is required. Type in a line such as:

-t imch

If this option is used by itself, the build system will generate the files needed to compile the standard version of Mini vMac for Macintosh OS X on Intel using Apple's Xcode 2.4.1 development environment. Options for some other targets and development environments are listed below.

You may also type in other options listed on the Mini vMac Options page. Each option can be on a separate line, or can instead be separated by a spaces. (The new line, space, and tab characters are equivalent.)

The Develop page has more options useful to developers and maintainers.

The build system ignores text contained in brackets (between and including the symbols ‘{’ and ‘}’), so you don't need to type these comments.

When you are done specifying options, choose the ‘Go’ command from the File menu (of the emulated Macintosh). {Alpha}: Clicking on the progress indicator area at the bottom of the window is equivalent to choosing the ‘Go’ command. The build system will generate an archive containing all the files needed to compile Mini vMac with the chosen options.

The build system can handle multiple sets of options at once, separated by ";".

{Alpha}: Another feature for automation is importing files, such as by using the “Import” command in the File menu. This is equivalent to copying the contents of the file, and pasting it into the build system window after removing any existing text (such as by the ‘Select All’ and ‘Clear’ commands), and then choosing the ‘Go’ command. Another way of importing files is dropping their icons onto the build system window or application icon. Multiple files can be dropped, and they will be all be processed. (Though if there is an error, that error is reported, and all remaining files are forgotten.) If the build system application was not yet running when icons are dropped on it, then the application automatically quits after processing all the files. Other ways of generating kAEOpenDocuments apple events, besides dropping files on the application icon, should also work, such as AppleScript. You can also double click on files in the Finder that have the build system as their creator. The “Export” command in the File menu creates such files.

When the build system is run Mini vMac 3.0.0 or later, it will automatically export this archive to the real computer. If the build system is run on a different emulator, or a real 680x0 Macintosh, this archive will be left in the folder “output”, in the folder containing the “MnvM_b34” application. If the folder "System Folder:Preferences:Gryphel:Build:output" exists, output is directed there instead. (This is useful if you keep the Mini vMac source disk image locked, to help ensure consistent compile results.)

Extract this archive on your real computer, and the resulting folder has all the files needed to compile Mini vMac with your development environment. More specific instructions for various targets and development environments follow:

Macintosh OS X - Intel

Building with Xcode 2.4.1:

(For other versions of Xcode, use the “-ev” option.)

Use this option in the build system:

-t imch

Extract the archive and in the resulting folder open “minivmac.xcodeproj”. Choose the “Build” command from the “Build” menu. When it finishes there should now be a program called “minivmac” in the same folder.

Macintosh OS X - PowerPC

Building with Xcode 2.4.1:

(For other versions of Xcode, use the “-ev” option.)

Use this option in the build system:

-t mach

Extract the archive and in the resulting folder open “minivmac.xcodeproj”. Choose the “Build” command from the “Build” menu. When it finishes there should now be a program called “minivmac” in the same folder.

Building with Metrowerks CodeWarrior:

Mini vMac was last tested with version “8.3”. Use this option in the build system:

-t mach -e mw8

Launch the CodeWarrior IDE, and choose the “Import Project ...” command from the “File” menu. select the file “minivmac.mcp.xml”. It then asks where you wish to put the project file. You must put it in the same folder as “minivmac.mcp.xml” or it won’t work. Unfortunately, the dialog doesn’t default to this folder. You can name the file “minivmac.mcp”, but the exact name doesn’t matter. You can now choose the “Make” command from the “Project” menu, and when it finishes there should now be a program called “minivmac” in the same folder.

Microsoft Windows

Building with Microsoft Visual C++ 2005 Express Edition:

(For other versions of Microsoft Visual C++, use the “-ev” option.)

Use this option in the build system:

-t wx86

Extract the archive and in the resulting folder open the file “minivmac.sln”. Choose the “Build Solution” command from the “Build” menu. When it finishes there should now be a program called “minivmac.exe” in the same folder.

Building with the lcc-win32 system:

Use this option in the build system:

-t wx86 -e lcc

Launch lcc-win32 and choose the “Import...” command from the “Project” menu. Select the file “minivmac.prj”. Choose the “Make” command from the “Compiler” menu. When it finishes there should now be a program called “minivmac.exe” in the same folder.

Building with Bloodshed Dev-C++:

Mini vMac was last tested with version “4.9.8.0”.

Use this option in the build system:

-t wx86 -e dvc

Launch Bloodshed Dev-C++ and choose the “Open Project or File...” command from the “File” menu. Select the file “minivmac.dev”. Choose the “Compile” command from the “Execute” menu. When it finishes there should now be a program called “minivmac.exe” in the same folder.

Building with Metrowerks CodeWarrior:

Mini vMac was last tested with version “8.3”.

Use this option in the build system:

-t wx86 -e mw8

Launch the CodeWarrior IDE, and choose the “Import Project ...” command from the “File” menu. select the file “minivmac.mcp.xml”. It then asks where you wish to put the project file. You must put it in the same folder as “minivmac.mcp.xml” or it won’t work. You can name the file “minivmac.mcp”, but the exact name doesn’t matter. You can now choose the “Make” command from the “Project” menu, and when it finishes there should now be a program called “minivmac” in the same folder.

Macintosh OS 9

Building with the Macintosh Programmers Workshop:

Mini vMac was tested with the most recent version, with the updated components from 12/04/02. No further MPW updates are expected.

Use this option in the build system:

-t mppc

Set the current directory to the extracted folder. (One way to do this is the “Set Directory...” command in the “Directory” menu.) Type “make” in the Worksheet window in a line by itself, and then press the “Enter” key to execute this command. This creates a list of commands. Select all of these commands (one way to do this is to use the “undo” command twice) and then press the “Enter” key to execute them. When the cursor stops spinning, there should now be a program called “minivmac” in the same folder.

Building with Metrowerks CodeWarrior:

Mini vMac was last tested with version “8.3”.

Use this option in the build system:

-t mppc -e mw8

Launch the CodeWarrior IDE, and choose the “Import Project ...” command from the “File” menu. select the file “minivmac.mcp.xml”. It then asks where you wish to put the project file. You must put it in the same folder as “minivmac.mcp.xml” or it won’t work. Unfortunately, the dialog doesn’t default to this folder. You can name the file “minivmac.mcp”, but the exact name doesn’t matter. You can now choose the “Make” command from the “Project” menu, and when it finishes there should now be a program called “minivmac” in the same folder.

Linux

Building with the Linux command line:

Mini vMac for Intel 32 bit Linux is compiled with the Gnu tools in Red Hat Linux 7 (running in Microsoft Virtual PC). Mini vMac for x86-64 Linux is compiled with the Gnu tools in Ubuntu 10.04 LTS . Mini vMac has also been compiled on a number of other Linux distributions without change. It probably should work with most Linux distributions, and some other Unix and similar operating systems, perhaps with some adjustments to the Makefile and the configuration files.

Use one of these options in the build system:

-t lx86 { Linux - Intel (32 bit) }
-t lx64 { Linux - x86-64 }
-t lppc { Linux - PowerPC }

Open a terminal window and change the current directory to the extracted folder. (Such as by using the “cd” command.) Then type “make” (and press return). When it finishes, there should now be a program called “minivmac” in the same folder.

Solaris

Building with the Gnu C compiler:

For SPARC use this option in the build system:

-t slrs

For Intel use this option in the build system:

-t sl86

(There currently isn't any difference in the source generated for SPARC and Intel except for the version name.)

Open a terminal window and change the current directory to the extracted folder. (Such as by using the “cd” command.) Then type “make” (and press return). When it finishes, there should now be a program called “minivmac” in the same folder.


www.gryphel.com/c/minivmac/build - feedback